"In the midst of my own colon cancer treatment, I experienced an unexpected hospital visit. Not pleased with this turn of events, I quickly packed and grabbed the Gordon’s book. In my dreary hospital room, I started reading and was totally captivated. I read the entire book that afternoon and was awash in a journey story that put forth both the permission to fall apart and the spouse’s experiences with the patient falling apart. Dan adroitly illuminates the struggle, joy, and anguish of being chief supporter and caregiver. Paralleled with Judy’s journey of spiraling emotions, the reader knows at the end that it is definitely okay to fall apart. This perspective, written in alternating voices, is a welcome addition to cancer literature and one I would highly recommend."

Carla Slatt-Burns

 

ABOUT US

Judy and Dan

The authors have been married to each other since 1970. They were high school sweethearts who wed upon college graduation. They live in Denver, Colorado as do their two sons and their growing families.

When Judy was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2003 at age fifty-five, Judy and Dan shared the cancer journey together. And they shared the writing of this memoir.

Judy

Judy is a writer by profession. She writes how-to publications for nonprofit clients (www.judygordon.biz). In 1999, Judy authored Parenting Our Daughters: For Parents and Other Caring Adults, published by Girls Count, a Denver-based organization. She is a member of the Colorado Authors League and Spellbinders (a national organization of volunteer storytellers).

Dan

Dan is a writer by avocation. He has written personal essays and opinion columns, but most of his work has been fiction. He uses his writing to explore and hopefully gain insight into the human condition. Dan has a thirty-year career in retail.

 

 

Photos

 
Gail and Judy walking in the 2004 Race for the Cure, Denver.   One of many different head treatments.

 

 
Mary’s gift of a pink boa for Judy’s 2004 Race for the Cure apparel.   We celebrate with one of our oncology nurses—the end of six months of chemo.

 

 

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