"I have been recovering from open heart surgery and reading Dan and Judy’s wonderful book helped me to keep those day-to-day fears and anxieties in perspective. Their courage, steadfastness, and humor made for an entertaining read, which is something rare in the realm of disease treatment. Reading the book also made me appreciate the support that my spouse has provided, and left me inspired to renew my diligence with the tasks of getting back to a full life."

Dave Zook

 

ABOUT OUR BOOK

The Onslaught of Emotion and Information Following Diagnosis

Judy

Our medical professionals were eager to get us as much information as we needed about the options for treatment, but they all told us that we now needed to take our time in deciding what to do. What to do?! My gosh, if these experts didn’t tell us exactly what to do, how could we, as lay people, make good decisions?

. . . I used the time to talk to people who were not medical professionals. I chose to talk to people I knew who had had breast cancer, and especially those who had dealt with it recently. With treatments advancing so quickly, it didn’t seem helpful to talk to people whose breast cancer experiences were anything other than recent. Those I spoke with were candid in sharing details of their experiences, and that helped me understand both the medical procedures as well as the potential emotional impact of each.

Dan

And when the word came that Judy was looking at a rough time ahead, both physically and emotionally, I geared up to be the support system she would need. But I wasn’t emotionally involved in the experience until much later. Too much happened too quickly once the diagnosis was made. The cancer instantly impacted all aspects of our life. As was her nature and under the circumstances, Judy gave free rein to her emotions. I, however, held mine in check. That can be seen as a good thing. My being strong and grounded for both of us would help us through the difficult times. It may even have been the best way for me to be. But despite my outward demeanor, the emotions were still there, more varied and intense than I ever could have guessed at the time. It was only when I began writing my part of these memoirs and reading Judy’s excerpts that I realized the extent and depth of the emotions involved, and I felt them as well.

Judy

The focus of our thoughts, conversations, and actions from diagnosis day through the start of chemo two months later was the unwelcome world of medicine, of disease. We were meeting many medical professionals, all of whom we wanted to trust and from whom we wanted answers and assurances. We were consumed with procedural things. There is so much information to deal with. We needed to be thoughtful, inquisitive, and focused, and at the same time we still had our daily lives to maintain. But cancer creates chaos and confusion. Prospects are overwhelming when cancer is present in your life. Emotions surface quickly. Crying came easy to me, and I let it come. It washed over me. Sometimes I felt relieved, and sometimes I felt drained. But it always felt necessary. There were tears of fear, of frustration, of sadness, of prayer, and of being touched by others’ care and concern. The tap was quick to flow; it was always primed.

 

Topic Hightlights

The Onslaught of Emotion and Information Following Diagnosis

Dealing with the Medical Community

Adjusting to a New Shaped Body

..............................

..............................